Introduction to scientific investigation through, project-based studies of biological phenomena., Topics in this hands-on course introduce students, to experimental design, data collection, data, analysis, hypothesis testing, and scientific, communication. Topics will vary according to, faculty expertise. See department website for, specific section details.
An introduction to core principles that underlie, all of biology, illustrated through, evidence-driven examples centered on integrative, organismal biology and organisms' interactions, with the biotic and physical environment. We will, explore the evolution of life, flow of information, within and among individuals, the influence of, structure on function at scales from individuals, to ecosystems, the transformations of energy and, matter in space and time, and the dynamic systems, that characterize Earth and its inhabitants., Topics will vary according to faculty expertise., See department website for specific section, details. Can be taken before or after BIO 202.
Key concepts of plant biology, including, morphology, physiology, adaptations to life on, land, and ecological interactions with other, organisms. Emphasis on the roles of plants in, ecosystems and human lives. Key characteristics of, major plant lineages in the context of how plants, have become such a diverse and successful group of, organisms. Students conduct independent research, projects on various aspects of plant biology., Laboratory.
Interactions between organisms and their physical and biological environment. Ecology of populations, communities, ecosystems, and landscapes; theoretical and empirical approaches. Applications of ecological principles to conservation and resource management. Through working application problems, reading primary literature and designing their own studies, students learn to conduct ecological studies and interpret results. Classes using team-based learning; laboratory; one weekend field trip.
Advanced study of theory and methods of, reconstructing hypotheses of evolutionary history., Modern phylogenetics relies heavily on models of, molecular evolution, thus the course includes a, foundation of molecular evolutionary theory. We, discuss applications of phylogenies including, analyses of gene family evolution, the emergence, of infectious disease, biogeography, and, coevolution. The lab centers on computational analyses.
The biology of the nervous systems of vertebrates, and invertebrates, with emphasis on cellular and, molecular approaches. Electrical signaling in, excitable cells, the physiology and biochemistry, of synaptic transmission, neuropharmacology. The, biological bases of learning, memory, and some, neurological disorders. Sensory systems and, neuronal development. Laboratory focus on, student-designed projects. Lecture and laboratory.
Advanced study of current issues in biology, as, determined by student and/or faculty interest., May, extend existing areas of the curriculum or, explore, new subjects. Offering contingent on student, interest and faculty availability.
Advanced study of current issues in biology, as, determined by student and/or faculty interest., May, extend existing areas of the curriculum or, explore, new subjects. Offering contingent on student, interest and faculty availability.

For students in Tamily Weissman's Rogers summer program.

This short exam for graduating biology majors will help the department assess the effectiveness of our current curriculum.