Explores important themes across countries in the Global South (particularly in Africa, Latin America, and Asia) and the significance of the Global South in international politics and governance. The course will be centered around important overarching patterns and puzzles that span the Global South, including exploring the themes of democracy, development/inequality, migration, rising powers, conflict, and the implications of Covid-19. Additionally, the course will also push students to engage in discussion/debate concerning the Global South as a counterweight to the North, inequalities in the North/South relationship, as well as explore examples and themes of resistance.
Introduces major debates surrounding the militarization of relief, politicization of aid, and armed interventions. Addresses tensions, surrounding the appeal to "care for distant, strangers," management of violence, and the response of various actors from NGOs and international institutions to individuals, media, celebrities. Students will become familiar with the key actors, agencies, and ideas in the development of modern humanitarianism, explore lessons from major past and present crises, and engage with the stories of people affected.
While religion often makes headlines during terrorist attacks or civil conflict, the political ramifications and political use of religious identity are far broader and more complex. Aside from being associated with terrorism, violence, and divisive politics, religious actors and ideas have played a significant role in the democratization of countries, in peacebuilding, in conflict resolution, in global humanitarianism, in resistance or social movements, and religion is a central human right and human rights issue in international affairs. This class will explore these and other issues as we investigate the role of religion in international affairs.
Introduces students to political, social, and, economic issues facing African states (primarily, sub-Saharan), covering both domestic and, international dimensions. The course explores the, historical origins and contemporary dynamics of, challenges associated with democratization, civil, conflict, and underdevelopment, as well as, emerging opportunities and prospects. Students, gain specific country expertise and are also, equipped to make sense of the variation in the, experiences of a range of African countries.
Introduces major debates surrounding the, militarization of relief, politicization of aid,, and armed interventions. Addresses tensions, surrounding the appeal to "care for distant, strangers," management of violence, and the, response of various actors, from NGOs and, international institutions to individuals, media,, celebrities, and businesses. Students will become, familiar with the key actors, agencies, and ideas, in the development of modern humanitarianism,, explore lessons from major past and present, crises, and engage with the stories of people, affected.
An overview of contemporary U.S. foreign policy, from a historical and theoretical perspective., International, domestic, bureaucratic, and, individual determinants of policy-making. New, challenges and prospects for U.S. foreign policy, in the post-Cold War era.
Analysis and explanation of the historical forces, that shaped the complexities of this region,, placing the area in its proper setting and, perspective.