This is where students and advisees can make appointments for office hours. If your plans change, please be sure to come back to cancel your appointment so that someone else can sign up for that slot! You can also email me at: daena@lclark.edu

Introduction to the conceptual and philosophical, foundations of the discipline, from classical, rhetorical theory through contemporary, perspectives, including critical theories of human, interaction. How humans construct and negotiate, meaning in different contexts, including, interpersonal relationships, public address, small, groups and organizations, mass media. Moral,, ethical, and policy issues.
Introduction to the conceptual and philosophical, foundations of the discipline, from classical, rhetorical theory through contemporary, perspectives, including critical theories of human, interaction. How humans construct and negotiate, meaning in different contexts, including, interpersonal relationships, public address, small, groups and organizations, mass media. Moral,, ethical, and policy issues.
History and theory of rhetoric, including major, developments in rhetorical theory from antiquity, up to the present. Rhetoric's relationship with, philosophy, knowledge, and culture. Examination of, persuasive messages in various forms, including, politics, advertising, film, video.
Theory and practice of rhetoric within, organizational settings. Development of, rhetorical skills for professional settings,, including public speaking, networking,, interviewing, small group interaction, crisis, management techniques, negotiation.
Introduction to theories of interpersonal, communication processes (e.g., social support,, uncertainty management, privacy management,, conflict, deception). Influence of new media on, these processes, impact of communication media on, identities, relationships, and communities.
Survey of the major theoretical approaches to, film, media, and popular culture from the past, 150 years. Theories include critical (Marxist,, feminist, critical race), formal (montage,, realism, aesthetics), new media, and media, effects. The course seeks a broad understanding, of what media are and how they work in a, democracy. Seniors will be given registration, preference during the first round of, registration.
Investigation of argumentation and social justice., Exploration and application of scholarship through, the community-based Thank You for Arguing, a, mentoring program run with local inner-city public, schools. Theoretical and methodological frameworks, for understanding the role of argumentation in, fostering social justice explored through, readings, classes discussion, and writing, assignments.
This course is designed to explore the role of, argument and persuasion in the history, evolution,, and dissemination of science. Its purpose is to, give students a firm understanding of various, rhetorical strategies within scientific discourse, and how those strategies impact public policy. The, general trajectory of this course is, chronological, tracing major controversies in the, sciences from pre-modern times to the present. At, every stage students will be asked to consider how, argument, persuasion, and symbolic action, influence both scientific and political practice.
This class explores how LGBTQ and queer identities, lives, and communities have become visible in and to mainstream America through the media of film and television. In turn, we will also examine how media representations of LGBTQ and queer Americans have shaped conversations of what it means to be gay/queer in the United States.