How unique are politics in Russia? Can the tools, of comparative political analysis help us, understand the complexities of Russian politics?, This course will investigate these questions by, studying Russian politics in a comparative, perspective. Although this course will begin by, examining Russia's political development in the, early 20th century, emphasis will be placed on, developments in the post-communist period., Throughout the class, close attention will be, placed on the ways that Russia is both similar to, and different from countries in the "West," former, communist countries, and countries at Russia's, same level of economic development. We will then, use this information to untangle how Russia is, ruled today. Students can expect to read, predominantly scholarly articles, but will also be, exposed to various materials from novels, news, media, or films.
The role of public opinion in the American, political process; the problem of identifying the, public and the extent to which this public, exercises political authority; techniques of, researching public opinion. Political, socialization, formation of attitudes, group, differences, mass opinion, elite opinion, direct, action. Research design, data collection, scaling,, analysis, and interpretation of data in the, context of research on polling.
Constitutional foundations and the unfolding of, various concepts of executive power throughout the, 19th and 20th centuries. The dynamics of the, presidency and the extent to which one person can, be held responsible for expanded responsibilities., The organizational models and practices of, 20th-century presidents. Other branches of, government examined to illuminate the functioning, and malfunctioning of the executive branch.
The politics of the founding period; interactions, within and among the executive, legislative, and, judicial branches; the federal division of, institutionalized powers; public opinion, interest, groups, and political parties; the policy process, in areas such as defense, welfare, civil rights, and liberties, and international affairs.
The politics of the founding period; interactions, within and among the executive, legislative, and, judicial branches; the federal division of, institutionalized powers; public opinion, interest, groups, and political parties; the policy process, in areas such as defense, welfare, civil rights, and liberties, and international affairs.
The politics of the founding period; interactions, within and among the executive, legislative, and, judicial branches; the federal division of, institutionalized powers; public opinion, interest, groups, and political parties; the policy process, in areas such as defense, welfare, civil rights, and liberties, and international affairs.
Introduction to the methodological principles and, issues in political science research, using, readings within and beyond political science., Identifying variables and mechanisms, developing, and testing theories, collecting and measuring, data, and assessing a study's ability to achieve, causal inference. Introduction to different, approaches to research, including experiments,, case studies, and regression analysis. Strongly, recommended for sophomores or juniors who have, declared a POLS major, as this course is a, prerequisite for thesis and some senior capstone, courses.
The structure and functioning of political parties, from the local to the national level;, organization, staffing, and policy development of, parties. Pluralist analysis, group theory, impact, of interest group activity on the American, political system.
A framework for analysis of the policy-making, process. History, dynamics, and trends of major, U.S. economic policies. The scope of American, domestic policy; subsidies and aids to business,, labor, agriculture, consumers; antitrust policy, and the Federal Trade Commission; public-utility, regulation; natural-resources policies; full, employment; antipoverty and defense spending.
Analysis and evaluation of how civil society and, social capital have promoted and shaped a variety, of outcomes such as democratization and, government performance. Students will critically, analyze works from diverse regions of the world, such as North America, Western Europe, Eastern, Europe, and Asia. In-class activities and a, semester-long project will step students through, the research process on a core concept within the, subfield of comparative politics.